4 Cloud Storage Questions to Guide Your Data Strategy

Written by Joe Kozlowicz on Thursday, March 9th 2017

Businesses of all types are collecting more data — sometimes this is inadvertent, sometimes it is completely intentional. With more and more devices connected to the internet and your corporate network, in addition to software that can store and analyze that data, information sprawl is a real factor in IT infrastructure strategy.

In order to better plan for data management, you should ask yourself these four questions. They can help guide your data strategy to maintain security, minimize risk, plan for costs, and improve performance.

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A Partner Can Help Fill Your Cloud Skills Gap

Written by Joe Kozlowicz on Tuesday, March 7th 2017

If you’re like many modern organizations, you’re looking towards a “cloud-first” IT strategy, where new workloads are architected with cloud deployment in mind, and older infrastructure is redesigned for the cloud as time and requirements allow. But you may also face a common obstacle to these goals: a cloud skills gap among your IT staff.

 An ISACA report claims that it takes three months months to fill 55% of information security vacancies, and six months or longer for an additional 32%. Intel security discovered that 36% of organizations lack cloud skills, but are still continuing on their adoption path. Only 15% of the 2,000 surveyed IT professionals claimed they had no cloud skill shortage.

It’s clear that many enterprises and midize businesses may require help managing these new cloud environments — especially when departments are adopting shadow cloud and shadow IT services at an increasing rate, as the Intel report corroborates.

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Does Your Organization Need Cyberinsurance?

Written by Joe Kozlowicz on Thursday, March 2nd 2017 — Categories: Cloud Hosting, Colocation, Disaster Recovery, Security

In the past decade, alongside the increased importance of digital tools for business, a new category of insurance has sprung up to cover digital data breaches and liability. With the average total cost of data breaches reaching $4 million dollars and the average cost of each lost or stolen digital record increasing to $158, it is clear that experiencing a data breach is an expensive affair.

While dedicated security response teams and encryption do decrease these costs, and IPS/IDS systems and other security measures can help reduce the risk, many organizations will still experience a data breach at some point.

Cyberinsurance can help mitigate the cost of a data breach by reimbursing your company for legal fees, helping with the cost of crisis management and investigation, notification costs, extortion liability fees, and third party damages relating to network or system outages. But does every organization need cyberinsurance?

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To Maintain IT Security, You Might Need to Annoy Your Users

Written by Joe Kozlowicz on Friday, February 17th 2017 — Categories: Security

We've posted quite a bit about best user practices to maintain the integrity of your IT infrastructure, especially strong password hygiene, the use of antivirus/antimalware, and the importance of backups in the case something goes awry. With user negligence causing up to 68% of breaches, according to a Ponemon Research study, these practices are essential. But how can you make sure your employees adhere to them?

But a recent article covering the Clinton presidential campaign staff methods to encourage information security reveals one secret to IT security: being kind of annoying.

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Legal Battles Over Local Data: Why Your Cloud Location Matters

Written by Joe Kozlowicz on Wednesday, February 15th 2017 — Categories: Cloud Hosting, Cloud Storage, Security

Placing data in the cloud comes with a set of concerns — accessibility (will my information always be available if the cloud has technical problems?) and security (how safe is my data when I can’t control the security measures?) chief among them. Of these, security has long been the primary concern for technology decision makers considering the cloud.

Recent surveys reveal that while security remains top of mind, the location of data is rising in prominence as a barrier or concern for cloud adoption. These concerns stem in part from the difficulty of visibility into data transit and storage. Customers might want to know where exactly their data is residing so they can retrieve it quickly — and also for legal implications.

Two recent court cases between Google, Microsoft, and the Federal Government highlight the legal entanglements that could come with storing information in the cloud. Read on to learn why the location of your cloud data is vital.

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